Why the facts of 9/11 are suppressed

Why the facts of 9/11 are suppressed

Understanding the ruling group-mind behind the war without end

by John McMurtry

Again, there is no counter-evidence or argument. There is just disconnection from and between the facts across the left-right spectrum. [...] What more evidence is required for the wall of the unthinkable to be moved? How can the long-prepared plans for war crime invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq (which 9/11 alone justified to the public) *not* be connected across the dots by still-thinking people? [...] If one remembers the record of sacrifices of countless thousands of people to covert geo-political strategies of which the US corporate security state is known already to be capable, what could be the cognitive disorder which could block the recognition of these connected facts and their meaning? [...] The corporate market calculus all lived by would not be deterred by such an ‘externality’ anymore than the oil business they come from is concerned about far more deaths from their pollutions and extractions. [...] Why most simply considered as the most elementary known principle and question of forensic judgement-justice in the face of any crime, ‘cui bono?’ - ‘who benefits?’ - suspended here, on 9/11? [...] Note throughout: No one [...] raises the most basic of all issues. Cui bono? What explains why the self-evident is unthinkable? There is something at work within and across people’s conciousness as citizens and consumers which has not yet penetrated. Some form of instituted mind-lock blocks out the normal first question. [...] still, the question remains publicly unspeakable. Why would the most basic forensic question and facts continue to be overlooked when only ever-more gains for this ruling group and their oil men and military constituencies piled one on top of another from 9/11 on? [...] Why would the most elementary logic of any normal reading of criminal intent and action - ‘whose interests are alone served?’ - remain unthinkable? That is a mystery. [...] How could anyone of sane mind not connect the staggering gains by these people to the same people’s failures to protect against 9/11; which provided all the new powers? The problem of denial runs deep into the collective psyche. The anomaly to be explained is how in an open society of cynical market calculation the most evident facts of ruling group-gain - at almost everybody elses increasing expense - can be so successfully repressed? ‘I can’t believe that!’ is a sign pointing back to the block behind it. Even the consuming public’s insatiable desire to know the dark secrets of the rich and famous is here still. Something deeper than regime propaganda is at work. Those who believe that the in-group running the US national security state could not possibly have been involved in 9/11, are by self-admission, no longer connected to the issue of fact or truth. They move within a deeper regime of meaning which operates across individuals and classes and beneath reason. [...] All step to the march of the group-mind’s meta-program by which experience and perception are themselves organised. This is the ordering framework of conciousness and terms of which coherence and meaning are found in whatever is selected for attack - however false the justifications or defenceless the victims might be. Even the doomsday bombing of innocent poor peoples on a constructed pre-text is perceived through the prism of this ruling group-mind as a war for ‘goodness’ and ‘freedom’. This is an old pattern in American expansion of continental and global market power; but becomes fanatic in a new way with the construction of 9/11. Few dare to see the propelling mindset behind. In the 9/11 turn, one stigma phrase has held the group-mind in a set-point of compliance that asks no questions. ‘conspiracy theory!’ - is the term of art for the silencing operation. Fear of ridicule does the rest.
— Dr. John McMurtry, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, 2004.

FULL VIDEO: Live lecture, International Citizens Inquiry into 9/11, Toronto, May 30, 2004 (51 min).